Home Historical Fiction Review: The Story of Mina Lee – The Monotony of the Great American Dream

Review: The Story of Mina Lee – The Monotony of the Great American Dream


Title: The Last Story of Mina Lee
Author:
Nancy Jooyoun Kim
Publisher:
Park Row Books

Genre(s): Fiction, Historical Fiction
Subject(s)/Themes(s): Asian-American immigrants
Representation: Korean MCs (ownvoices)

Release Date: September 1st, 2020
Page Count: 384 (hardback)
Rating: 4.0/10

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Margot Lee’s mother, Mina, isn’t returning her calls. It’s a mystery to twenty-six-year-old Margot, until she visits her childhood apartment in Koreatown, LA, and finds that her mother has suspiciously died. The discovery sends Margot digging through the past, unraveling the tenuous invisible strings that held together her single mother’s life as a Korean War orphan and an undocumented immigrant, only to realize how little she truly knew about her mother.

Interwoven with Margot’s present-day search is Mina’s story of her first year in Los Angeles as she navigates the promises and perils of the American myth of reinvention. While she’s barely earning a living by stocking shelves at a Korean grocery store, the last thing Mina ever expects is to fall in love. But that love story sets in motion a series of events that have consequences for years to come, leading up to the truth of what happened the night of her death.

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What traits do we inherit from our culture’s history?

That’s something I think about on occasion. Like, how a good chunk of our personality might be determined by something that some random person in our country did decades or centuries before we were born. One action that branched into another and another, until an entire cataclysmic event sprouted and fell with a ricochet that would be felt generations later.

Maybe it’s pride that we inherited. Maybe it’s something more sinister – bitterness, fear, hate, a defensiveness that comes from trying to squash down the knee-jerk bitterness, fear, and hate. Maybe such cultural traumas are always inevitably passed down, zero chance of escape, and the best we can do is understand and navigate them.

That’s more or less the lane of thought The Last Story of Mina Lee ventures into. And when it comes to the topic of personal traumas wrapped in cultural traumas and one’s disassociative response to them, this book nails it. Does it so well, in fact, that I felt disassociated from the narrative itself.

Boredom, meet book. The only reason I didn’t scribble it down as a DNF was because I wanted to know the real reason behind Mina’s death. Surely all this slow burn was leading up to some sort of payoff? Disappointment, meet Kathy.

The prose is a head-scratcher. The writing is technically good, descriptive and occasionally florid, and yet so dry that you can scrape splinters with it. The book is meant to be a slow-paced slice-of-life story strung together by small and intimate moments, but everything felt so strangely devoid of real emotions and it was like I was seeing things happen through multiple sheets of glass. Any emotional connection I formed with these characters were annoyingly casual and brief.

I found Margot’s chapters especially trying. A lot of dull spoon-feeding of exposition and musings and an endless list of questions. That last one drove me insane. Asking rhetorical questions every other paragraph doesn’t make a scene any more poignant or mysterious, and at some point it just becomes silly and reads like a weird third-person diary.

Still, Margot does offer some memorable moments of clarity and reflections regarding immigrant life and culture (if not a better insight into her own personality beyond “young Asian-American woman who has a prickly relationship with her mom”):

“How much language itself was a home, a shelter, as well as a way of navigating the larger world. And perhaps that was why Margot never put much effort into learning Korean. She hadn’t been able to stand to be under the same roof as her mom.”

Mina’s chapters are slightly better. They follow her as she tries to adjust to a new life in L.A. Koreatown in the wake of her family’s death. It’s a look into the life of an immigrant who arrived with nothing but the clothes on her back, hoping to escape into a better future – or, at the very least, a different one. It’s utterly, distinctly unromantic, which is both a positive and a negative. Mina’s day-to-day drudgery at her supermarket job is only punctuated by the occasional conversations with her neighbour and coworker, and it’s clear that this is a woman who’s stuck in a rut, going through the motions of life.

Is it a realistic portrayal of someone who’s in her position? Whittled down by recent tragedies, compounded by her memories of the Korean War, further compounded by her struggles as an undocumented immigrant? Absolutely. Does it make for an engaging read? No. Especially not when her conclusion feels so rushed and empty, like a book with the endpages ripped out.

And, at the end of it, I’m not quite sure what audience the book is meant to satisfy. Is it a mystery? If you squint really hard, yes. Is it a mother-daughter family drama? In a very one-sided, perfunctory way, sure. Are there other Asian-American stories that handle this theme of cultural displacement with more conviction? Definitely.

See – I too can ask many questions and give not-quite-satisfying answers.

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Thank you to the publisher for having me on the blog tour!

I’m now off to knock on the Wordpress gates and have some words with whoever designed this new interface and grumble at the fact that we’re being forced to use it. WHY.

Meanwhile, you can also find me on:

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9 comments

travelingcloak August 20, 2020 - 7:11 am

Oh no! Sorry you did not like this one. I have it scheduled for next week. Guess we will see how it goes.

Reply
debjani6ghosh August 20, 2020 - 7:30 am

The blurb seemed pretty evocative and intriguing. Sorry to know, it turned out to be a less-than-average read for you. Better luck with your next book, Kathy.

Reply
bookishinbed August 20, 2020 - 7:29 pm

I am also on the tour for this one. I am only 17% into it but I am intrigued because it’s not something I’ve read about before. Hoping it works out well.

Reply
maddalena@spaceandsorcery August 21, 2020 - 7:21 am

*OUCH* Rhetorical questions raining on the hapless reader?
That would have me running for hills at warp speed! 😀 😀
Thanks for the warning…

Reply
waytoofantasy August 21, 2020 - 9:50 am

Don’t even get me started on the block editor lol.
Sorry that this one was so boring for you. I think the concepts it struggles with are interesting, wish it had been more of an intriguing read.

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Gemma August 21, 2020 - 11:26 am

I think it would have helped if they connected the two stories more. Or if maybe Margot had traveled to Korea? Or had it just been Mina’s story?

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A Storm Of Pages August 22, 2020 - 6:00 am

It’s always disappointing when a story veers from trying to portray how boring the day-to-day slog can be, and turn into a slog itself. Especially one with an intriguing synopsis!

Oh, don’t get me started on block editor… I ended up writing down a step-by-step guide to my usual posts in a notebook as I kept forgetting which exact block with which settings I was using… ugh.

Reply
jennifertarheelreader August 25, 2020 - 7:04 pm

I’ve really curious about this one, so I appreciate your thoughtful review. I am a few days behind seeing this and hope you are reading something you love now. ❤️

Reply
universewithinpages August 26, 2020 - 1:11 pm

Sorry you didn’t like this one! Hope your next read is better <3

Reply

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